The crime in Greece: The prejudice against the foreigners

By Minos-Athanasios Karyotakis

On Wednesday on June 7th a 30-year-old foreign perpetrator attacked and killed with his knife the 52-year-old owner of a grill tavern in Corfu, Greece.

“Crime on Corfu: The Albanian asked the 52-year-old baker “You’re the one?” and killed him with five knife stabs…With five knife stabs, the three of which proved fatal, the 30-year-old Albanian murdered the 52-year-old grill owner in Corfu”, wrote on his website one of the most popular news organization in Greece wanting to highlight the origins of the perpetrator, as in Greece the Albanian nationality is often related to criminality. Continue reading

International food trade drains fast the global groundwater supplies

ABANDONED_WAREHOUSES_AND_DUMP_ON_HUDSON_RIVER_-_NARA

By Minos-Athanasios Karyotakis

According to recent hydrological modelling and Earth observations, international food trade causes groundwater depletion at alarming rates due to large consumption of wheat, rice and cotton.

“Of the world’s 37 major aquifers, about 20 are past sustainability tipping points and correspond to our major food-producing regions. Groundwater induced land subsidence is like the deflation of a tire and mainly occurs where clay minerals exist, which is about a quarter of the central valley in California. We are currently experiencing the fastest rates of groundwater depletion and subsidence ever,” said hydrologist Jay Famiglietti on March 28th at the 2017 South-eastern Conference (SEC) Academic Conference hosted by Mississippi State University. Continue reading

The shadow of China

The U. S. subprime mortgage crisis of 2008 provoked a global discussion in academic and regulatory circles about the so-called “shadow banking”, the regulators of financial systems and the rapid financial liberalization and deregulation.

“Shadow banking exists alongside the formal banking system, offering similar kinds of services, but it is lightly or not regulated at all. Its institutions are therefore highly leveraged and more prone to failure or “bank runs” (for example, liquidity shocks)”, mentions Dawa Sherpa in her article in Economic & Political Weekly some years ago[1]. Continue reading